LETTERS IN THE MAIL

When was the last time you received a handwritten letter in your mailbox? And I’m not talking about your email mailbox!

I have always been a letter writer. When I was a teenager I had several pen pals. In fact I had 7 pen pals in Hawaii! Some of their letters to me are still glued today to the pages of my scrapbooks. A few years ago after signing up with Facebook I decided to see if I could track down a couple of the girls, and after much searching I received a message back from one. She remembered me and we have now become friends on Facebook.

Even during the Vietnam War I became pen pals with a boy and he wrote quite more in the letters than a teenager would have. But he was lonely and looking for a girlfriend. He even came to visit when he returned back to the states.

In my family research, I wrote many letters to people asking for information and pictures and patiently waited for their responses. And it was always so exciting to find a letter waiting in the mailbox.

One of the most interesting letters I ever received was when I was contacted by a 90-plus age woman who wrote me about my Civil War grandfather. I was blown away, knowing that there was someone living that actually knew a Civil War Veteran. She wrote very descriptive letters about his death, funeral and even down to who built his coffin. She, at a very young age even helped drape the black satin cloth inside on top of the piled high cotton. This was the type of letter you wanted to share with someone – right away. But often there’s no one in the house that’s as excited as you.

The last letter I’ve had written to me was from a women in Greene County, Ga. who wrote me after reading an editorial I’d written in the paper. She wrote me several letters detailing life in her early years and of the area in which I had questioned.

I truly treasure my letters written to me and have saved many of them. Now I ask you, when did you last write a letter to someone? Sit down and surprise someone with that letter. Letter writing is truly a lost art due to our computer era of “you’ve got mail.”

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